2018 ShanghaiTech Workshop on Emerging Devices, Circuits and Systems

Distinguished Speakers

ShanghaiTech Symposium on Information and Science and Technology

Wayne Luk

Professor

Imperial College London

Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering , IEEE Fellow , BCS Fellow

Speech details

Alberto L. Sangiovanni-Vincent

Professor, The Edgar L. and Harold H. Buttner Chair

University of California at Berkeley

Member of the US National Academy of Engineering , ACM Fellow , IEEE Fellow

Speech details

Lihong V. Wang

Professor

California Institute of Technology

Member of the US National Academy of Engineering , AIMBE Fellow , Electromagnetics Academy Fellow , IEEE Fellow , OSA Fellow , SPIE Fellow

Speech details

 

 

 

 

Invited Speakers

ShanghaiTech Symposium on Information and Science and Technology

Jiangdong Deng

Senior Principal Scientist, Associate Director

Center for Nanoscale Systems, Harvard University

Speech details

Lei He

Professor

University of California at Los Angeles

SRC Inventor Award (2007) , NSF CAREER Award (2000)

Speech details

Weida Hu

Professor

Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

NSFC Distinguished Young Scholar, National Distinguished Young Experts (Thousand Young Talents Program)

Speech details

Takehiro Imura

Project Lecturer

University of Tokyo

Speech details

 

 

 

 

Young Jae Jang

Associate Professor

Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology

Speech details
img

Hao-Chung(Henry) Kuo
View homepage

Hao-Chung(Henry) Kuo

Distinguished Professor

National Chiao Tung University

IEEE Fellow, OSA Fellow, SPIE Fellow, IET Fellow

Speech details

Albert Liu

Founder and CEO

Kneron, Inc

Speech details

Lei Liu

Assistant Professor

University of Notre Dame

Speech details

 

 

 

 

Yan Lu

Assistant Professor

University of Macau

Speech details

Chris Mi

Professor and Chair

San Diego State University, University of California, San Diego (adjunct)

IEEE Fellow, SAE Fellow

Speech details

Liming Nie

Professor

Xiamen University

Speech details

Zeljko Pantic

Assistant Professor

Utah State University

Speech details

 

 

 

 

Johann Peter Reithmaier

Professor

Universitaet Kassel, Germany

IEEE Fellow

Speech details

Yiyu Shi

Associate Professor

University of Notre Dame

NSF CAREER Award , IBM Invention Achievement Award

Speech details
img

Liang Song
View homepage

Liang Song

Professor

Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Shenzhen Peacock Program

Speech details

Lalita Udpa

Professor

Michigan State University

IEEE Fellow

Speech details

 

 

 

 

Alan Xiaolong Wang

Associate Professor

Oregon State University

Speech details
img

Lida Xu
View homepage

Lida Xu

Professor and Eminent Scholar

Old Dominion University

Member of the European Academy of Sciences , Member of the Russian Academy of Engineering , IEEE Fellow , Changjiang Scholar

Speech details

Xiaolin Zhang

Professor

Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

National Distinguished Experts (Thousand Talents Program)

Speech details
img

Lirong Zheng
View homepage

Lirong Zheng

Professor and Dean

Fudan University

National Distinguished Experts (Thousand Talents Program)

Speech details

 

 

 

 

Yuanjin Zheng

Associate Professor

Nanyang Technological University

Speech details
img

Qi Zhu
View homepage

Qi Zhu

Associate Professor

Northwestern University, USA

NSF CAREER Award (2016) , TCCPS Early Career Award (2017)

Speech details

 

 

 

 

ShanghaiTech Symposium on Information and Science and Technology

Speakers and Speeches Information

Jiangdong Deng

Center for Nanoscale Systems, Harvard University

Title: Blooming Nanotechnology at Harvard

Abstract:  This talk will introduce an evolution of CNS (Center for Nanoscale System) to create a collaborative research environment and platform for one of the most comprehensive nanotechnology research communities in the world. CNS provides shared instrumentation facilities and infrastructure, expert staff, educational opportunities, and scientific research engagement in the areas of fabrication, imaging, and characterization of nanoscale structures, across the disciplines of applied physics, biology, chemistry, electrical engineering, geology, materials science, medicine and physics.

Bio:  JD is Associate Director of Center for Nanoscale System (CNS), as well as the lead for Nanofabrication facility and Scanning Probe Microscope group. Dr. Deng received his first doctorate in physics from Nankai University in China, then the second Ph. D degree in Electrical Engineering from Virginia Tech. (VT). After working as a project manager in a nanotechnology industry for 3 years, he joined CNS in 2004 as principal scientist. His current research interests include various nanofabrication technologies, especially advanced lithography and process integration, photonic/ electronic sensor structures, MEMs/NEMs device, and Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM)-based nano-characterization.

Weida Hu

Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Title: Infrared photodetector based on 2D materials: progress, challenges, and opportunities

Abstract:  Infrared photodetectors based on traditional thin-film semiconductors such as InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe as well as novel type-II superlattice exhibit highly sensitive detection capability. However, these devices always need to work at low temperature, resulting in an additional large and expensive cooling system. Recently, 2D materials have attracted tremendous attention owing to their bandgap tunability and potential optoelectric applications. Nevertheless, as a photoconductive detector, the signal-to-noise ratio could be very low without the suppression of dark current. Meanwhile, the performance of 2D photodetectors is strongly affected by surface states resulting in the restricted electron-hole separation efficiency, and intrinsic ultrathin absorption thickness of 2D photodetectors suffers the low quantum efficiency. In this talk, we review the progress on infrared photodetectors based on 2D materials in my group. We fully exploit the detection ability of 2D materials by introducing localized-field, including ferroelectric filed, vertical heterojunction field, p-n junction photovoltaic field and so forth. With a strong induced localized-field, high performance photodetectors based on Graphene, TMDs, Black phosphorus, Black arsenic-phosphorus etc. in infrared wave band may lead to a disruptive revolution in prospective low dimensional optoelectronic devices. Finally, we deliver an outlook, discuss the challenges and future directions, and give general advice for designing and realizing novel high-performance infrared photodetectors to provide a guideline for the future development of this fast-developing field.

Bio:  Weida Hu received his B. S. and M. S. degree in Material of Science from Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, China, in 2001 and 2004, respectively, and Ph.D. degree (with honors) in Microelectronics and Solid-State electronics from the Shanghai Institute of Technology Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in 2007. He is currently a full professor (Principal investigator) on fabrication and characterization of infrared photodetectors/photodiodes/phototransistors in Shanghai Institute of Technology Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. He has authored or coauthored more than 110 technical journal papers and conference presentations. He received the National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars in 2017, National Science Fund for Excellent Young Scholars in 2013, and National Program for Support of Top-notch Young Professionals (Ten Thousand Talents Program for Young Talents) in 2015. He is selected as the Royal Society-Newton Advanced Fellowship in 2017. He is also serving as the Associate Editor of Infrared Physics & Technology, the Executive Editor of Optical and Quantum Electronics, the Program Committee of SPIE DCS Defense and Security - Infrared Technology and Applications (USA), and the Program Committee of the International Conference on Numerical Simulation of Optoelectronic Devices (NUSOD).

Young Jae Jang

Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology

Title: Operations and system perspectives of a transportation and material handling system using wireless power transfer technology

Abstract:  Recent advances in wireless power transfer technology (WPT) have created a new type of transportation and logistics system. The On-line Electric Vehicle (OLEV), the first commercialized WPT-based transportation system developed at KAIST, is one example. The OLEV’s driving range is extended by charging the battery from infrastructure installed under the road while the vehicle is in motion. This new type of electric vehicle (EV), known as a dynamic wireless charging EV, has also opened up new areas of transportation research, particularly in the areas of operations and systems. In this talk, I will first present the system design of the OLEV and operations issues encountered during the development experience. I will then discuss recent trends in research into dynamic wireless charging EVs, such as charging infrastructure optimization, economic analysis, and transportation modeling. Finally, I will outline promising research directions and future automated material handling systems with WPT operated by AI based algorithm. Some engineering and technological issues will be discussed along with operations and infrastructure system design issues.

Bio:  Young Jae Jang received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2007 and a double M.S. in Mechanical Engineering and Operations Research from MIT in 2001. He received a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Boston University in 1997. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), South Korea. He is also the Director of Shinsung-KAIST Artificial Intelligence (AI) Automated Material Handling System (AMHS) Research Center. His current research includes the stochastic modeling of complex systems and optimizations in transportation and AMHS. He is involved in the KAIST OLEV project to develop and commercialize an innovative wireless charging electric vehicle, which was recognized as one of the “50 Best Innovations of 2010” by TIME Magazine. His role in the project is to develop the optimal energy management system to integrate the vehicle system into the road traffic network. He has published numerous technical papers on OLEV technology, including "The Optimal Economic Design of the Wireless Powered Transportation System," which was selected as Best Paper at the 2013 International Conference on Intelligent Manufacturing and Logistics Conference. Dr. Jang was the Technical Program Chair of the 2014 IEEE Vehicular Technology Workshop on Emerging Technologies on Wireless Power and General Chair of the International Symposium on Semiconductor Manufacturing Intelligence (ISMI) 2015. He also served as an associate guest editor of the IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics special Issue on wireless charging technology in 2015.

Albert Liu

Kneron, Inc

Title: A Reconfigurable Streaming Deep Convolutional Neural Network Accelerator for Internet of Things

Abstract:  Convolutional neural network (CNN) offers significant accuracy in image detection. To implement image detection using CNN in the Internet of Things (IoT) devices, a streaming hardware accelerator is proposed. The proposed accelerator optimizes the energy efficiency by avoiding unnecessary data movement. With unique filter decomposition technique, the accelerator can support arbitrary convolution window size. In addition, max-pooling function can be computed in parallel with convolution by using separate pooling unit, thus achieving throughput improvement. A prototype accelerator was implemented in TSMC 65-nm technology with a core size of 5 mm2. The accelerator can support major CNNs and achieve 152GOPS peak throughput and 434GOPS/W energy efficiency at 350mW, making it a promising hardware accelerator for intelligent IoT devices.

Bio:  Albert Liu, Kneron’s founder and CEO. After graduating from the Taiwan National Cheng Kung University, he got the scholarships from Raytheon and the University of California to join the UC Berkeley/UCLA/UCSD research programs, and then got his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Before establishing Kneron in San Diego in 2015, He has worked in R&D and management positions in Qualcomm, Samsung Electronics R&D centre, MStar and Wireless Information. Albert has been invited to give lectures of computer vision technology and artificial intelligence at the University of California, as well as to be a technical reviewer for many internationally renowned academic journals. In addition, Albert participated in leading technology development in Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), Bell Labs, and NASA, and owned more than 30 international patents in the areas of artificial intelligence, computer vision and image processing. He has published more than 40 papers in major international journals.

Lei Liu

University of Notre Dame

Title: Optically-Controlled Millimeterwave-to-THz Tunable/Reconfigurable Devices for Advanced Imaging and Adaptive Communication

Abstract:  Tunable and reconfigurable mmw-terahertz (THz) devices such as modulators, variable attenuators, tunable filters, coded apertures, phase shifters and high-level switches (e.g., SPDT, DPDT) that are required for advanced sensing, imaging and adaptive wireless communication applications are challenging to realize. We report a promising approach to develop the above mmw-THz devices based on spatially-resolved optical modulation (SROM) using photo-induced (PI) free carriers in semiconductors. The fundamental mechanism for this approach will first be introduced followed by prototype demonstrations for free-space modulators, reconfigurable coded-aperture imaging masks, beam steering/forming antennas, tunable mesh-filters, and waveguide-based tunable modulators/attenuators. The potential to develop more advanced tunable/reconfigurable THz devices (e.g., tunable delay lines, SPDT, DPDT switches) using optically-controlled waveguide architectures such as PI electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structures and dynamically-reconfigurable PI substrate-integrated waveguides (SIWs) will also be discussed on the basis of performance-improved SROM using the so-called mesa-array technique.

Bio:  Dr. Liu (S'99-M'07-SM'18) received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Nanjing University, Nanjing, China, in 1998 and 2001, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia (advisor: Robert M. Weikle), Charlottesville, VA, in 2007. From 2007 to 2009, he was a Post-Doctoral Research Associate with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia. In September 2009, he joined the faculty of the University of Notre Dame, where he is currently an Assistant Professor of electrical engineering. He is also a research faculty fellow with the Advanced Diagnostics and Therapeutics Initiative (AD&T) of the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include millimeter- and submillimeter-wave device and circuit design, modeling, and testing, quasi-optical techniques, terahertz detectors for imaging and spectroscopy, novel microwave materials and devices, superconducting electronics, microfabrication and processing. Dr. Liu is a member of the IEEE, the HKN honor society, and a member of IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques (MTT) society. He has published ~120 journal and conference papers, and received over 2500 peer citations. Dr. Liu is a reviewer for IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory & Tech., IEEE Trans. Terahertz Science & Tech., IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Lett., IEEE Trans. On Appl. Supercon., Nature Communications, IEEE Trans. On Adv. Packaging, IEEE Trans. Wireless Communications, IEEE Trans. Electron. Devices, IET Electron. Lett., IEEE Trans. On Circuits and Systems II, IET Microwaves, Antennas & Propagation, Journal of Electromagnetic Waves and Applications (JEMWA) Progress in Electromagnetic Research, Optics Express, Sensors and Actuators A, Journal of Applied Remote Sensing, Light Science and Applications, ACS Molecular Pharmaceutics. He served as a session chair for the IEEE ASC conference (2006), session co-chair for IEEE International Microwave Symposium (IMS 2015), and a student paper competition judge for IEEE IMS (2011), in Baltimore. His students won the 2012 IEEE Asia-Pacific Microwave Conference (APMC, Taiwan) Student Prize, the 2012 International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter and Terahertz Waves (IRMMW-THz, Wollongong, Australia) Best Student Paper Award, and the 2015 IEEE MTT-S Graduate Fellowship Award.

Yan Lu

University of Macau

Title: Bi-directional Battery-to-Battery Wireless Charging with Reconfigurable Wireless Power Transceivers

Abstract:  This talk will introduce the bi-directional wireless power transfer application for portable devices, enabled by our reconfigurable wireless power transceiver chips. Here, two reconfigurable wireless power transceivers, which reuse almost all of the hardware, are briefly discussed. In particular, a novel cross-connected structure for the differential class-D power amplifier in the transmitter mode is proposed for reducing the switching losses. Fabricated in 0.35µm standard CMOS process with 5V devices, over 78% battery-to-battery charging total efficiency and over 0.6A wireless charging current are demonstrated with two identical transceiver chips with printed coupling coils on board.

Bio:  Yan Lu received the PhD degree in Electronic and Computer Engineering from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Hong Kong, in 2013. Then, he joined the State Key Laboratory of Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI of University of Macau as an Assistant Professor, in 2014. His research interests include wireless power transfer circuits and systems, RF energy harvesting, next-generation power management solutions. From 2013 to present, Yan has contributed 9 ISSCC papers all in the power management IC area, including 3 as the first author and 5 as the principle investigator. In addition, Yan has authored/co-authored 20+ SCI (mostly IEEE) journal papers, and filed three US patents. Dr. Lu also co-authored three book chapters, one book entitled “CMOS Integrated Circuit Design for Wireless Power Transfer” published by Springer, and edited one book entitled “Selected Topics in Power, RF, and Mixed-Signal ICs” published by River Publishers. Yan was a recipient/co-recipient of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society Pre-doctoral Achievement Award 2013-2014, the IEEE CAS Society Outstanding Young Author Award 2017, and the ISSCC 2017 Takuo Sugano Award for Outstanding Far-East Paper.

Chris Mi

San Diego State University, University of California, San Diego (adjunct)

Title: High Efficiency Wireless Charging of Automatic Guided Vehicles

Abstract:  Wireless power transfer technology offers significant improvement in convenience and electric safety for electric vehicle (EV) charging. Both capacitive and inductive wireless power transfer technology have been investigated for various applications. In this talk, we discuss a tightly-coupled inductive power transfer (IPT) system for the low-voltage and high-current charging of automatic guided vehicles (AGVs). There are two major challenges in the system design. First, the self-inductances and coupling coefficient of a tight-coupled magnetic coupler are sensitive to airgap variation. Second, the low-voltage and high-current condition can result in an extremely small load resistance that induces difficulty to optimize the efficiency. There could be a large amount of high-order harmonic currents in a tightly-coupled IPT system, and we have provided an effective circuit design method to reduce the harmonics. Through comparison, the integrated-LCC compensation circuit is selected as the solution, and it shows four merits: good robustness to airgap variation, easy controllability, convenience to optimize the system efficiency, and low high-order harmonic current distortion. Aiming at the AVG charging application, a prototype is implemented and the magnetic coupler size is 220mm×200mm×10mm. Experimental results show that it achieves 1.78 kW power transfer from 300 V DC source to 24 V battery with 86.1% efficiency and 73.8A charging current across an airgap of 15 mm. In zero- and full-loading conditions, when the airgap distance varies between 5 mm to 25 mm, the system power variation is within ±36.7% and the efficiency is not significantly affected.

Bio:  Chris Mi is a fellow of IEEE and fellow of SAE, Professor and Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the Director of the US DOE funded GATE Center for Electric Drive Transportation at San Diego State University, San Diego, California, USA. He was previously a professor at the University of Michigan, Dearborn from 2001 to 2015. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, China, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, all in electrical engineering. Previously he was an Electrical Engineer with General Electric Canada Inc. He was the President and the Chief Technical Officer of 1Power Solutions, Inc. from 2008 to 2011. He is the Co-Founder of Mia Motors, Co-founder and CTO of SNC Technology, Inc. His research interests are in electric and hybrid vehicles. He has taught tutorials and seminars on the subject of HEVs/PHEVs for the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the IEEE, workshops sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Society of Professional Engineers. He has delivered courses to major automotive OEMs and suppliers, including GM, Ford, Chrysler, Honda, Hyundai, Tyco Electronics, A&D Technology, Johnson Controls, Quantum Technology, Delphi, and the European Ph.D School. He has offered tutorials in many countries, including the U.S., China, Korea, Singapore, Italy, France, and Mexico. He has published more than 100 articles and delivered 30 invited talks and keynote speeches. He has also served as a panelist in major IEEE and SAE conferences. Dr. Mi is the recipient of “Distinguished Teaching Award” and “Distinguished Research Award” of University of Michigan Dearborn. He is a recipient of the 2007 IEEE Region 4 “Outstanding Engineer Award,” “IEEE Southeastern Michigan Section Outstanding Professional Award.” and the “SAE Environmental Excellence in Transportation (E2T) Award.” He was also a recipient of the National Innovation Award and the Government Special Allowance Award from the China Central Government. In December 2007, he became a Member of Eta Kappa Nu, which is the Electrical and Computer Engineering Honor Society, for being “a leader in education and an example of good moral character.” Dr. Mi was the Chair (2008-2009) and Vice Chair (2006-2007) of the IEEE Southeastern Michigan Section. Dr. Mi was the general Chair of the 5th IEEE Vehicle Power and Propulsion Conference held in Dearborn, Michigan, USA in September 6-11, 2009. Dr. Mi is one of the three Area Editors of the Editor of IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications. He served on the review panel for the NSF, the U.S. Department of Energy (2007–2010), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (2010), Hong Kong Research Grants Council, French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Agency for Innovation by Science and Technology in Flanders (Belgium), and the Danish Research Council. He is the topic chair for the 2011 IEEE International Future Energy Challenge, and the General Chair for the 2013 IEEE International Future Energy Challenge. Dr. Chris Mi is a Distinguished Lecturer (DL) of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society. He is also the General Co-Chair of IEEE Workshop on Wireless Power Transfer sponsored by six IEEE Societies (PELS, IAS, IES, VTS, MAG, and PES), Guest Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics - Special Issue on WPT, Guest Co-Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics Special Issue on WPT, Guest Editor of IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics - Special Issue on dynamic wireless power transfer, and steering committee member of the IEEE Transportation Electrification Conference (ITEC- Asian). He is the program chair for the 2014 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference (IEVC) in Florence Italy December 17-19, 2014. He is also the chair for the IEEE Future Direction’s Transportation Electrification Initiative (TEI) e-Learning Committee and developed an e-learning module on wireless power transfer.

Liming Nie

Xiamen University

Title: Photoacoustic imaging-based molecular imaging in precise cancer theranostics

Abstract:  Firstly, the author reports self-developed photoacoustic microscopy and photoacoustic tomography systems, and their biomedical applications of photoacoustic imaging at micro-level and macro-level. Furthermore, the author will introduce the role of molecular probes with high sensitivity and high specificity. Then demonstrates the combination of photoacoustic imaging and other modal imaging techniques. Finally, close the talk by outlooking the prospect of clinical transformation, such as early detection and diagnosis of tumor.

Bio:  Dr. Liming Nie is a professor in Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine of Xiamen University. He has achieved systematic achievements on improvement and application of photoacoustic imaging-based molecular imaging on disease diagnosis and therapy monitoring. He has published >30 SCI papers as corresponding or first author with more than 1900 citations. He has delivered more than 20 invited talks in international conferences. Specifically, he has improved the theory of aggregates imaging enhancement in tumor in situ. He has improved and developed photoacoustic microscopy to achieve accurate guidance of cancer chemotherapy (Nat. Commun. 2017, ACS Nano 2014). He has proposed a photon recycler concept to achieve noninvasive brain imaging through human skull intact and realized precise boundary identification reference between normal and diseased tissue (J. Biomed. Opt., 2013, Adv. Mater. 2016, Eur. Radiol. 2018). He has developed multimodal probes with high specificity to achieve more sensitive detection of cancer and realize theranostics in one platform (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2017). He has been granted 3 patents from China and United States. The patent of photoacoustic microscopy is being licensed in enterprises. He is also cooperating with physicians from hospitals for clinical study of patient cancers. In 2017, he was awarded "Outstanding Youth" Funding of Fujian Province and received ACS Nano Young Scientist Award.

Johann Peter Reithmaier

Universitaet Kassel, Germany

Title: 1.55 µm Quantum Dot Gain Material for Temperature-Stable High-Performance Optoelectronic Devices

Abstract:  The major performance data of optoelectronic devices show usually a strong temperature dependence due to carrier redistribution from ground to excited states. This is even more severe in smaller bandgap materials such as InP based compounds addressing telecom emission wavelengths at 1.55 µm. With atomic-like gain material, such as quantum dot (QD) material, one can expect strong improvements due to delta-like density of states distribution. In an ideal case of large enough energy splitting between ground and exited states the carrier distribution stays the same independent of the operation temperature resulting in constant performance of lasers, i.e. temperature independent threshold conditions, differential efficiency and modulation properties. The talk will give an overview about the most recent progress in the development of InP-based QD gain material for directly modulated laser diodes, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) and widely tunable narrow linewidth lasers for coherent communication. A major breakthrough in QD material was the significant reduction of the inhomogeneous linewidth broadening to 17 meV (low-T photoluminescence) for a single QD layer caused by a reduced dot size distribution [1]. Based on this new generation of QD material temperature stable lasers with high characteristic temperatures (T0 = 140 K, T1 > 900 K) for threshold and differential efficiency, respectively, could be obtained [2]. Due to a high optical gain of up to 100 cm-1, short cavity lasers with a length of 230 µm could be modulated up to 35 GBit/s [3]. Based on the same QD gain material, semiconductor optical amplifiers were fabricated showing similar high temperature performance, which allow a temperature independent operation between 20 and 100 °C without significant deterioration [4]. For coherent communication, narrow linewidth lasers are needed as reference for signal detection. QD laser material exhibits a symmetric gain function resulting in rather low linewidth enhancement factors (< 1) in comparison to quantum well lasers (typically > 3-4). Due to this low linewidth enhancement factor the laser linewidth in distributed feedback (DFB) QD lasers could be reduced by about one order of magnitude to a record value of 110 kHz. Results of a widely-tunable (46 nm) narrow-linewidth light source based on a DFB laser array with an integrated SOA will be also presented [5]. The authors would like to thank the financial support via the EU project SEQUOIA, the BMBF-project MONOLOP and the Israel Science Foundation.

Bio:  Prof. Reithmaier studied physics at TU Munich and made his PhD at Siemens and Walter-Schottky-Institute in 1990. Until 1992, he worked as Postdoc at IBM in Rüschlikon, Switzerland on III/V epitaxy. In 1992, he joined University of Würzburg where he built-up a research group working on nanostructured semiconductors and their applications in optoelectronic devices. In 2005 he became a full professor of physics and director of the Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics at the University of Kassel. He is author or co-author of more than 650 journal and conference papers (about 325 in refereed journals, 2 books, 7 book articles and 125 invited talks, > 11,500 citations), He is a member of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG) and of IEEE Photonics Society. He became Fellow of IEEE in 2011. Since 2014, he is co-editor of OPTICA. He was and is on the advisory board of different national centers (EPSRC National Centre for III-V Technologies in UK 2010-2016, Centre of Nanophotonics for Terabit Communications (NATEC) in Denmark since 2016). Since 2016, he is speaker of the Center of Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT) of University of Kassel. His current interests are focused on nanostructured semiconductors and their optoelectronic applications. This includes self-assembly techniques of III-V quantum dot materials on GaAs, InP and Si substrates as well as nanostructuring by high-resolution lithographical techniques. New types of devices are investigated like nanolasers, single photon sources, ultra-high speed and narrow linewidth lasers, high power lasers, light emitting devices on silicon and nanocrystalline diamond for biomedical, quantum computing and quantum communication applications.

Alberto L. Sangiovanni-Vincent

University of California at Berkeley

Title: The Wonders and Threats of the Instrumented World

Abstract:  Information technology moves rapidly to an increasingly decentralized and collaborative environment (the Cloud) with rich interfaces to the physical world (the Internet of Things). In particular, it has been predicted that by 2020 several billions (thousands per person) of electronic devices will be available. These devices will allow making the computing infrastructure invisible to humans and supporting societal scale applications that are unthinkable today. However, even today, we are facing a number of severe challenges in applications such as autonomous vehicles, that should be monitored carefully with respect to safety, security and privacy concerns. Design of complex distributed system such as the Internet of Things is essentially about connections: Connection of concepts, Connection of objects, Connection of teams. Products of the future will be connected across physical and virtual domains. Connections can produce systems that offer more than the sum of the components but they can also lead to systems that are less powerful, secure and private than the sum of the components or that are so compromised by their interactions that they do not work at all. And this situation is getting worse: a nightmare waiting to occur! An efficient management of interactions among deployed parts of a larger system requires principles that are common to the design methods developed at the bleeding edge of technology. I will point to a number of exciting fields such as Industry 4.0, energy efficiency, synthetic biology, autonomous aircraft and cars where advances are constantly made towards the mastering of distributed, autonomous systems.

Bio:  Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli holds the Edgar L. and Harold H. Buttner Chair of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, at University of California, Berkeley. He helped founding Cadence and Synopsys, the two leading companies in EDA. He consulted for companies such as Intel, HP, Bell Labs, IBM, Samsung, UTC, Kawasaki Steel, Fujitsu, Telecom Italia, Pirelli, GM, BMW, Mercedes, Magneti Marelli, ST Microelectronics, ELT and UniCredit. He earned the IEEE/RSE Maxwell Award for “groundbreaking contributions that have had an exceptional impact on the development of electronics and electrical engineering”, the Kaufmann Award for seminal contributions to EDA, the EDAA lifetime Achievement Award, the IEEE/ACM R. Newton Impact Award, the University of California Distinguished Teaching Award, and the IEEE Graduate Teaching Award for inspirational teaching of graduate students. He is an IEE and ACM fellow, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and holds two honorary Doctorates. He authored over 850 papers, 17 books and 2 patents.

Yiyu Shi

University of Notre Dame

Title: On the Universal Approximability and Theoretical Bounds of Quantized Neural Networks for Edge Intelligence

Abstract:  Compression is a key step to deploy large neural networks on resource-constrained platforms. As a popular compression technique, quantization constrains the number of distinct weight values and thus reducing the number of bits required to represent and store each weight. While quantized networks are successful in practice even with the number of bits down to one, the theoretical foundation that explains the empirical results and guides the system design is largely missing. In this talk, I will formally discuss the representation power of quantized neural networks. First, I will prove the universal approximability of quantized ReLU networks. We then provide an upper bound of storage size given the approximation error bound and the bit-width of weights. The theoretical results partially explain the efficiency of quantized networks in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the very first theoretical work on the universal approximability as well as the associated storage size bound of quantized neural networks.

Bio:  Dr. Yiyu Shi is currently an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, and the director of the Sustainable Computing Lab (SCL). He received his B.S. degree (with honor) in Electronic Engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China in 2005, the M.S and Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2007 and 2009 respectively. His current research interests include hardware intelligence and three-dimensional integration. In recognition of his research, many of his papers have been nominated for the Best Paper Awards in top conferences. He was also the recipient of IBM Invention Achievement Award, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Faculty Invitation Fellowship, Humboldt Research Fellowship, IEEE St. Louis Section Outstanding Educator Award, Academy of Science (St. Louis) Innovation Award, Missouri S&T Faculty Excellence Award, NSF CAREER Award, IEEE Region 5 Outstanding Individual Achievement Award, and the Air Force Summer Faculty Fellowship. He has served on the technical program committee of many international conferences including DAC, ICCAD, DATE, ISPD, ASPDAC and ICCD. He is a member of IEEE CEDA Publicity Committee and IEEE Smart Grid R&D Committee, deputy editor-in-chief of IEEE VLSI CAS Newsletter, and an associate editor of IEEE TCAD, ACM JETC, VLSI Integration, IEEE TCCCPS Newsletter and ACM SIGDA Newsletter. He is also the chair of 2018 DAC System Design Contest on Machine Learning on Embedded Platforms.

Liang Song

Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Title: Photoacoustic Imaging: from technology development towards translation

Abstract:  Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid medical imaging technology that has experienced rapid growth during the past decade. It uniquely combines the advantages of optical absorption contrast (sensitive to molecular conformation and thus the early development of many diseases) with ultrasonic resolution for in vivo imaging as deep as 5 –7 centimeters. Here we will discuss some technology development pursued in our lab towards clinical translations, including: (1) endoscopic photoacoustic microscopy capable of imaging the microvasculature of gastrointestinal tract for early cancer detection and the composition of atherosclerotic plaques for vulnerable plaque identification; (2) real-time handheld photoacoustic multimodality imaging technology capable of guiding tumor biopsy and mapping the sentinel lymph nodes noninvasively; (3) fully integrated in vivo photoacoustic/two-photon microscopy with a resolution as fine as 320 nm and multiple contrasts—absorption, second-harmonic, and fluorescence—for tumor microenvironment imaging and study.

Bio:  Liang Song, Ph.D., is Professor at SIAT, CAS and founding director of the Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging. Prior to joining SIAT, he studied at Washington University, St. Louis and received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering. He has authored >50 peer-reviewed journal articles in Advanced Functional Materials, Optics Letters, Biomaterials etc., which have been cited by prestigious journals such as Science and Nature Medicine (Google scholar citations: 1505; h-index: 24). He serves on the editorial board of Photoacoustics (Elsevier CiteScore 2016: 5.7) and is a regular reviewer for >20 SCI-indexed journals such as Biomaterials, IEEE TMI etc. He has invented and developed multiple novel photoacoustic imaging technologies and been awarded >10 US and Chinese invention patents, for example: (1) optical-resolution intravascular photoacoustic endomicroscopy aiming for the identification of vulnerable plaques; (2) fully integrated photoacoustic/two-photon microscopy that can potentially open up new avenues for multi-contrast sub-cellular biomedical imaging; (3) handheld, real-time photoacoustic imaging system for cancer theranostics. His research on photoacoustics has been supported by the NSFC (including the National Key Instrumentation R&D Grant and National Excellent Young Scholar Award), the MOST of China, the local governments, and the industry.

Lalita Udpa

Michigan State University

Title: High resolution microwave imaging of anomalies using metamaterial lens

Abstract:  Firstly, the author reports self-developed photoacoustic microscopy and photoacoustic tomography systems, and their biomedical applications of photoacoustic imaging at micro-level and macro-level. Furthermore, the author will introduce the role of molecular probes with high sensitivity and high specificity. Then demonstrates the combination of photoacoustic imaging and other modal imaging techniques. Finally, close the talk by outlooking the prospect of clinical transformation, such as early detection and diagnosis of tumor.

Bio:  Lalita Udpa received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Colorado State University, USA, in 1986.Her research interests include various aspects of NDE, such as development of computational models for the forward problem in NDE, signal and image processing, pattern recognition and neural networks, and development of solution techniques for inverse problems. She is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the American Society for Nondestructive Testing and a member of Academia NDT International.

Alan Xiaolong Wang

Oregon State University

Title: Ultra Energy-Efficient Silicon Nanocavity Electro-Optic Modulator for Future Data Centers

Abstract:  Traditional silicon photonic modulators rely on the plasma dispersion effect by free-carrier injection or depletion, which occupies a large footprint and consumes relatively high energy for optical interconnects. Here we report an ultra-compact electro-optic modulator with total device footprint of 0.6 × 8 μm2 by integrating voltage-switched transparent conductive oxide with one-dimensional silicon photonic crystal nanocavity. The active modulation volume is only 0.06 um3, which is less than 2% of the λ3 volume. The device operates in the dual mode of cavity resonance and optical absorption by exploiting the refractive index modulation from both the conductive oxide and the silicon waveguide induced by the applied gate voltage. Such a metal-free, hybrid silicon-conductive oxide nanocavity modulator also demonstrates only 0.5 dB extra optical loss, high E-O efficiency of 250pm/V, and low energy consumption of 3fJ/bit. The combined results achieved through the holistic design opened a new route for the development of next generation electro-optic modulators that can be used for future data centers.

Bio:  Alan Xiaolong Wang is an Associate Professor of the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Oregon State University. He received his B.S. degree from Tsinghua University, and M.S. degree from the Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, P.R. China, in 2000 and 2003, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 2006. From January 2007 to August 2011, he was with Omega Optics, Inc., Austin, Texas, where he served as the Chief Research Scientist with more than 4 million dollars of research grants from various government agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), the Army Research Office (ARO), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He joined OSU as an Assistant Professor in August 2011 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2017. His current research activities at OSU are sponsored by NSF, NIH, AFOSR, Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI), the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DoE), and industrial sponsors such as Hewlett Packard, and Marine Polymer Technologies. He has more than 80 journal publications and more than 80 conference presentations (including 14 plenary/invited presentations), and also holds six U.S. patents. He is a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America (OSA), and the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE).

Lihong V. Wang

California Institute of Technology

Title: World’s Deepest-Penetration and Fastest Cameras: Photoacoustic Tomography and Compressed Ultrafast Photography

Abstract:  We developed photoacoustic tomography to peer deep into biological tissue. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) provides in vivo omniscale functional, metabolic, molecular, and histologic imaging across the scales of organelles through organisms. We also developed compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) to record 10 trillion frames per second, 10 orders of magnitude faster than commercially available camera technologies. CUP can tape the fastest phenomenon in the universe, namely, light propagation, and can be slowed down for slower phenomena such as combustion. PAT physically combines optical and ultrasonic waves. Conventional high-resolution optical imaging of scattering tissue is restricted to depths within the optical diffusion limit (~1 mm in the skin). Taking advantage of the fact that ultrasonic scattering is orders of magnitude weaker than optical scattering per unit path length, PAT beats this limit and provides deep penetration at high ultrasonic resolution and high optical contrast by sensing molecules. Broad applications include early-cancer detection and brain imaging. The annual conference on PAT has become the largest in SPIE’s 20,000-attendee Photonics West since 2010. CUP can image in 2D non-repetitive time-evolving events. CUP has a prominent advantage of measuring an x, y, t (x, y, spatial coordinates; t, time) scene with a single exposure, thereby allowing observation of transient events occurring on a time scale down to 100 femtoseconds. Further, akin to traditional photography, CUP is receive-only—avoiding specialized active illumination required by other single-shot ultrafast imagers. CUP can be coupled with front optics ranging from microscopes to telescopes for widespread applications in both fundamental and applied sciences.

Bio: 

Lida Xu

Old Dominion University

Title: Internet of things in industries

Abstract:  Internet of Things (IoT) has provided a promising opportunity to build powerful industrial systems and applications by leveraging the growing ubiquity of radio-frequency identification (RFID), and wireless, mobile, and sensor devices. A wide range of industrial IoT applications have been developed and deployed in recent years. In an effort to understand the development of IoT in industries, this talk reviews the current research of IoT, key enabling technologies, major IoT applications in industries, and identifies research trends and challenges.

Bio:  Li Da Xu is an IEEE Fellow, academician of European Academy of Sciences (Division of Engineering), and academician of Russian Academy of Engineering (formerly USSR Academy of Engineering). Dr. Xu is a 2016 and 2017 Highly Cited Researcher in the field of engineering named by Clarivate Analytics (formerly Thomson Reuters Intellectual Property &Science).

Lirong Zheng

Fudan University

Title: Ultra Low Power Sensor2Cloud Chipset for Internet-of-Things

Abstract:  Advanced electronics towards future ubiquitous intelligence and internet-of-things requires high network throughput along with long operation range and ultra-low energy consumption. Concurrent design of circuit, system, and communication has attracted new attention, which may facilitate design of ubiquitous sensing with energy-autonomy. In this talk, we present low power design of CMOS chipset for sensor to cloud interconnections, through trade-offs for computing, communication, and circuits. Embedded control-centric domain specific computing reduces data throughput, which gives 29% smaller code size when conducts general-purpose processing and over ten times better energy efficiency for application-specific processing. Compressed sampling based analog-to-information interface circuits are used for circuit implementation that not only simplifies the sensor front-end but also reduces raw data to be transmitted thus significantly save energy. Asymmetric wireless links in combination with ultra-wide-band (UWB) and ultra-high frequency (UHF) communications was proven to be a promising solution to achieve ultra-low power wireless communications for IoT sensors node. Finally we present chip implementation results for the above new concepts.

Bio:  Li-Rong Zheng received his Ph.D. degree in electronic system design from the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden in 2001. Afterwards he worked at KTH as a research fellow, associate professor and full professor. He is the founding director of iPack VINN Excellence Center of Sweden and the chair professor in media electronics at KTH since 2006. He is also a guest professor (since 2008) and a distinguished professor (since 2010) at Fudan University, Shanghai China. Currently, he holds the directorship of Shanghai Institute of Intelligent Electronics and Systems, and the IT School of Fudan University. His research experience and interest includes electronic circuits, wireless sensors and systems for ambient intelligence and Internet-of-Things. He has authored more than 400 publications and servers as steering board member of International Conference on Internet-of-Things.

Yuanjin Zheng

Nanyang Technological University

Title: Emerging Electromagnetic-Acoustic Sensing and Imaging beyond Radar and Ultrasound

Abstract:  Traditional electromagnetic sensing technique (e.g. Radar and Lidar) and acoustic imaging technique (e.g. microphone and ultrasound) have gotten wide applications in military, automotive, consumer, medical, and healthcare etc. fields. Emerging Electromagnetic-Acoustic (EMA) technique combines the merits of electromagnetic sensing with acoustic imaging, and goes beyond to fuse the sensors. In this forum, we will deeply discuss the implementations, functions and limitations of the respective sensors from circuits to systems, and therein to demonstrate their emerging applications. We would thus present thoroughly on realization of three types of sensors: (1) Low power phase array Radar chips for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging, (2) Photoacoustics sensors for blood oxygen and blood glucose sensing, and (3) EMA sensing systems for non-destructive testing (NDT). On the phase array radar transceiver, the design challenge is to generate and transmit multiphased wideband chirp signal in the transmitter and to implement stretch processing based wide angle high resolution beamforming in the receiver. The detailed circuits and architecture to implement the SAR sensor are presented. Photoacoustics sensors transmit focused laser light pulses deeply penetrating to the tissues/blood vessels, inducing high frequency ultrasound signals, and then the high resolution acoustic imaging can be formed by detecting the ultrasound signals. To miniaturize the entire sensor and achieve high sensitivity, the key modules of fibre coupled pulsed lasers, beamforming ultrasound transducers, and low power low noise signal acquisition circuits are designed and implemented. Furthermore, there appears increasing interests to adopt microwave induced thermoacoustics and magenetoacosutics sensors for NDT applications. We will briefly present our implementation of a resonant coil based EM transmitter for wireless power transfer and adopting an EMA receiver for non-contact sensing in a dedicated NDT application.

Bio:  Yuanjin Zheng received the B.Eng. and M.Eng. degrees from Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China, in 1993 and 1996, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, in 2001. From July 1996 to April 1998, he was with the National Key Laboratory of Optical Communication Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China. In 2001, he joined the Institute of Microelectronics (IME), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), and had been a principle Investigator and group leader. With the IME, he has led and developed various projects on CMOS RF transceivers, ultra-wideband (UWB), and low-power biomedical ICs etc. In July 2009, he joined the Nanyang Technological University, as an assistant professor and program director for Bio-imaging program, and then promoted to associate professor in 2017. His research interests are biomedical sensors and imaging, thermoacoustic and photoacoustic imaging, and SAW/BAW/MEMS sensors. He has authored or coauthored over 250 international journal and conference papers, 22 patents filed, and several book chapters.

Qi Zhu

Northwestern University, USA

Title: Beyond Functionality: Combating Timing and Security Challenges in the Design of Intelligent Systems

Abstract:  Intelligent engineering systems, such as autonomous vehicles, industrial robots, smart buildings and infrastructures, wearable devices and medical systems, have shown great economic and societal promises in recent years. The rapid development of sensing, data processing, control and communication methods brings new intelligent functionality and propels system advancement. However, the design and implementation of these systems are facing tremendous challenges beyond functionality, in particular on system timing and security. In many cases, violation of timing and security requirements may in fact lead to incorrect functional behavior and system failures. In this talk, I will discuss timing and security challenges in the design of intelligent systems, and introduce our work in combating these challenges with design automation techniques. In particular, I will present a cross-layer modeling, simulation, synthesis and verification framework for connected vehicle applications.

Bio:  Dr. Qi Zhu is an Associate Professor at the EECS Department in Northwestern University. Prior to Northwestern, he was an Assistant Professor and later Associate Professor in University of California, Riverside, and a Research Scientist in Intel. Dr. Zhu received a Ph.D. in EECS from University of California, Berkeley in 2008, and a B.E. in CS from Tsinghua University in 2003. His research interests include model-based design and software synthesis of cyber-physical systems, CPS security, embedded and real-time systems, and system-on-chip design. He received four best paper awards at DAC, ICCPS and ACM TODAES, the NSF CAREER award, and the IEEE TCCPS Early-Career Award. Dr. Zhu is an Associate Editor of IEEE TCAD, and has served on the program committees for a number of conferences in design automation, cyber-physical systems, embedded systems, and real-time systems.